Is the world’s poor leadership a direct consequence of society’s glorification of processing speed as opposed to other components of intelligence?

Is the world’s poor leadership a direct consequence of society’s glorification of processing speed as opposed to other components of intelligence?
I conjecture that much of the world’s poor leadership (whether in companies or in politics) can be psychometrically explained by the reign of processing speed (rather than logical, perceptual, and verbal ability for instance) as the main implicit criterion of eligibility for elite social status.

Very interesting question and angle; after considering, I tend to agree. I can recall many instances where decisions are made for expediency rather than quality or longevity. I know of a good robust leader, who moves from one decision to another with speed, but not fully understanding the consequences of her decisions, or indeed the full implications. This does not necessarily make her a poor leader, as the organisation has designed itself around her short comings and embraces the positive contribution. Her ever onward march is entrepreneurial and explicit. Everyone knows how she operates and manages accordingly.

Demand for speed is a requirement of our world today, a situation happen citizens demand action now, a company falters and customers require an instant fix. The ability ‘To turn on a penny’ is a skill, even the cornerstone of many businesses positioning. I don’t believe that the world’s leadership’s entire problem is to do with speed, although this is a key part, but the ever revolving situation of ‘over promotion of a manager to the position of leader’ is a key element. It seems to me that it is the way of the world that a management figure is, as the saying goes, promoted to the ‘highest level of incompetence’ without fully considering the requirement or implications of this action.

I regularly witness perfectly able team leaders promoted to managers, and managers given leadership positions without a support structure to aid them on their journey. It almost feels that gaining the leadership position is a ‘career final resting place’, rather than the start of a new and exciting learning experience where you adapt to the new and develop as a result.

These managers who are promoted to a leadership role think that the purpose of their function is to do what they did before, only better and faster. Don’t get me wrong, a good manager is worth their weight in gold and should be remunerated accordingly, but that doesn’t mean that he or she will be able to lead an organisation.

Perhaps if, as a world society, we were to reward people for their talent or specialism, not their title, we would have more appropriate people in their given roles and as a consequence more capable leaders who appreciate that sometimes things take time to get right.
*All comments are based on my personal experiences and given freely. That said, you need to make your own choices. I can’t and won’t accept liability for you employing any recommendations. Business is all about risk. It’s your choice.

Nigel stone has, over the last fifteen years, started, led, consulted and nurtured both UK and European businesses to achieve quite outstanding results. If you would like to contact him directly then feel free to email me at ns@leadersp.co.uk

Full copy to the question can be found at:

https://www.quora.com/Is-the-worlds-poor-leadership-a-direct-consequence-of-societys-glorification-of-processing-speed-as-opposed-to-other-components-of-intelligence

 
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